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Day 1: Aesthetic beauty at Marina Bay

Aerial shot of Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay
1 Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay

Start the day with an exploration of Singapore’s art scene at The Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay.

Colloquially referred to as ‘the durian’ due to its uniquely spiky architecture, this iconic centre of the arts hosts up to 3,000 performances annually, ranging from Russian ballet to aural journeys into Peking Opera. The venue accommodates patrons who need special seating arrangements due to limited mobility or sensory impairments. We recommend visiting for a matinee performance and bringing a cardigan along with you, as the Esplanade can get chilly, even in the afternoon.

If you’re feeling peckish, you can grab lunch at Makansutra Gluttons Bay. This open-air food centre specialises in local hawker fare like satay (grilled meat skewers) and chilli crab.

Wide shot of Dragonfly Lake at Gardens by the Bay at dusk
2 Gardens by the Bay

At dusk, make your way to Gardens by the Bay for a lesson in nature that spans the globe. Bask in the tranquillity of the Japanese-inspired Serene Garden, learn about orchids hailing from the Andes at the Cloud Forest, and watch the sun set on the towering structures of the Supertree Grove.

Wide shot of Singapore Flyer at dusk
3 Singapore Flyer

To take your imagination to new heights, and experience an unforgettable view of the city after dark, take a ride on the Singapore Flyer, and marvel at the golden lights of the Lion City, waiting to be explored.

Day 2: Religion and heritage in Chinatown

Exterior of Jamae Mosque
1 Masjid Jamae

Spend the morning discovering Singapore’s multi-religious culture in Chinatown. You’ll be able to spy the minarets of the Jamae Mosque from afar. One of Singapore’s oldest mosques, this Indo-Islamic building is a sight to behold.

As you take a leisurely stroll along South Bridge Road, you’ll encounter other religious institutions, including Sri Mariamman Temple and the Buddha Tooth Relic Temple & Museum. Feel free to step through the doorways of these places of worship to learn more about each belief system.

The interior display of musical boxes at Singapore Musical Box Museum
2 Thian Hock Keng Temple

First set up in 1849, the Thian Hock Keng Temple Annexe, also known as the Chong Wen Ge Building, was originally the location of Singapore’s first Chinese school. This charming building, also houses the Singapore Musical Box Museum.

Day 3: Culture and nature in The Civic District

Wide shot of Fort Canning Park metal gate
1 Fort Canning Park

Take a morning walk amidst lush greenery in the heart of the city at Fort Canning Park. Formerly known as Bukit Larangan (Forbidden Hill), this locale was a seat of power for both Malay kings and British colonial governors.

Nature lovers can learn about the region’s culinary tradition with a one-kilometre walking trail at the Spice Gardens, while history buffs should visit the Archaeological Dig Exhibition, which showcases relics and artefacts that have been unearthed at Fort Canning Park, some of which date back to the 14th century. We recommend visiting in the early morning and bringing an umbrella in case it rains or gets too sunny.

Family of 4 looking at an exhibit
2 National Museum of Singapore

History can be learnt from more than just textbooks; to be inspired by Singapore’s storied past, pay a visit to the National Museum of Singapore. Just a stone’s throw away from Fort Canning Park, the nation’s oldest museum is a trove of exhibits that offers insights into the grand arc and span of our country’s history. These range from Modern Colony—which uncovers Singapore’s colonial and cosmopolitan past—to Surviving Syonan, which documents the lives of Singaporeans during the Japanese Occupation.

If you’d like to acquaint yourself with Singapore’s heritage on a more intimate scale, we recommend visiting Growing Up. This permanent exhibition explores the lives of Singaporeans in the post-war years, and provides an up-close look into their day-to-day affairs.

Wide interior shot of National Gallery Singapore
3 National Gallery Singapore

A paradise for architecture and art aficionados alike, National Gallery Singapore was once Singapore’s City Hall and Supreme Court. It now serves as the city’s preeminent art gallery, and is bound to refine your aesthetic sensibilities, with its masterfully restored interiors and collection of over 8,000 works of art. Notable artists whose work have been exhibited here include Yayoi Kusama, Ai Wei Wei and Mark Rothko.

If you’ve never thought of food as art in its own right, you’ll gain a new perspective on dining at Odette. Helmed by Chef Julien Royer, this two-starred Michelin restaurant serves up exquisitely plated dishes that are feasts for both the eyes and the stomach.

Day 4: Nautical adventures on Sentosa

Wide interior shot of The Maritime Experiential Museum™
1 The Maritime Experiential Museum™

To immerse yourself in stories of the sea, embark on a learning journey at The Maritime Experiential Museum. Home to 15 galleries that document the history of the Maritime Silk Route, this charming space will enchant you with tales of ancient mariners, interactive exhibits and the intricacies of seafaring. Explorers with an interest in the nuances of nautical skills will get to deepen their knowledge of map reading, the usage of nautical compasses and how to tie sailing knots.

Alt text: Wide shot of aquarium at S.E.A. Aquarium™
2 S.E.A. Aquarium™ at Resorts World™ Sentosa

Continue on your nautical voyage with a trip beneath the waves. S.E.A. Aquarium™ is home to over 1,000 species of marine creatures, who make their home in 50 unique habitats. Of particular note is the shark enclosure, with toothy inhabitants that include hammerhead and silvertip sharks.

Round off your day with an aptly-themed meal at Ocean Restaurant by Cat Cora. Housed in the world’s largest oceanarium, this establishment’s wall-to-ceiling glass panels provide diners with a magnificent view of an underwater habitat, while they dine on Mediterranean-Californian seafood.

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