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Eating in Singapore

Singapore is seeing more exciting eateries sprout up in historically rich locales, and this blend of novelty and nostalgia has transformed once-sleepy spots into cool dining destinations.

Tiong Bahru has a charming mix of public housing flats and shophouses from the '30s and '40s. It is now filled with youthful energy, thanks to quaint cafes such as 40 Hands and Tiong Bahru Bakery as well as modern establishments like Bincho. You can find sterling examples of street food at Tiong Bahru Market and Food Centre.

Eating in Singapore

Rich in history, Jalan Besar is a gazetted conservation zone in the northeastern Kallang region, with hip new cafes like Chye Seng Huat Hardware (CSHH) and The Bravery. Yet, despite these newer establishments, long-time stalwarts like Swee Choon Tim Sum Restaurant are still around.

Eating in Singapore

Likewise, Duxton Hill, a district of conservation shophouses in Chinatown, is experiencing a revival, given the influx of trendy restaurants. Look out for Sabio Tapas Bar for small bites and Spanish wines, Parisian-style bistro L’Entrecôte and Lucha Loco for Mexican street food.

Eating in Singapore

Then there’s Gillman Barracks in the southern part of Singapore, with 13 art galleries inside colonial buildings amidst lush greenery. There’s scrumptious grub too, such as The Naked Finn for seafood and cocktails, Timbre @ Gillman for comfort food, tipples and live music, and MASONS for affordable French fare.

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